thisismizhalle:

tooothaches:

im sorry  i just i couldn’t sleep so i had to
dont look at me

I’m listening to some Swedish hiphop right now and Will’s dancing syncs to the beat and I may have laughed so hard I cried

Look at his face! His anger fuels his dancing. “EVERY PELVIS THRUST BRINGS ME CLOSER TO PROVING IT WAS YOOOOOOUUUUUUU!!!!!!

Ok, now I need to watch this show.

(via thestoutorialist)

Me, pretty much.

Me, pretty much.

murderpotato:

And that’s how easily there wasn’t yet another fatality in Hanni’s office.

[BOOP]

[BOOP]

(via thisismizhalle)

dduane:

The Gifset of Rassilon

Rassilon had a whole lot of stuff. I bet cleaning out the Closet of Rassilon would take you a while…

When you play the Game of Rassilon, you win or you regenerate. So you actually have a number of chances to win.

Also, I suspect the Record of Rassilon is an LP of Rassilon playing the Harp of Rassilon. In the Key of Rassilon.

(via sineala)

ktempest:

alexheberling:

It’s like Will never learned how most other people sit down on chairs, but everyone in the future is so respectful of cultural differences and quirks like that, no one ever said anything.

Yeah, I have always wondered what was up with that. Did Frakes sit down with himself and say: How do I make this Riker character more standouty? I know, I’ll have him throw his leg over the back of chair to sit down!

Note that as the show went on and a certain person’s uniform kept getting tighter around the middle this happened way less often. I’m just sayin’.

I’d guess that it’s an acting thing; it lets Frakes enter the scene and sit down quickly while keeping his face in the frame. Look at the last example, where Riker and some other person enter and sit down together. Riker is seated, balanced, looking up, and already speaking before the other person has finished sitting down. (Then he can make that dramatic odalisque pose.) In many of the scenes, the camera is focused on Riker as he is sitting, often when he’s speaking. The Riker maneuver means he doesn’t have to turn himself or the chair, or bend awkwardly, which might disrupt the shot. These all seem minor, but they can be very important for a director on a (time and money) budget. It took so long for many of us to notice the Riker maneuver (the Picard maneuver was much more noticeable, I think) because the directors are usually making the most of what it provided.

Also, look at some of those chairs. Some of them, particularly the Ten Forward ones, look pretty small, and might not swivel. How would you sit down on them? Remember, you don’t have time to adjust yourself when you do. Also, you can’t look down.

Finally, Jonathan Frakes is 6’4”. This is just how you deal with chairs when you’re tall.

mizhallelujah:

mizliz:

IT’S PEOPLE, ALANA

but what I really want to know is HOW DO YOU MAKE BEER OUT OF PEOPLE SERIOUSLY

Google was no help, all it told me was “you cannot make beer out of your vagina”. YES THANKS GOOGLE I WAS TOTALLY GOING TO BREW BEER IN MY HOO HAA BUT WITH YOUR ADVICE I HAVE DECIDED NOT TO! wtf!

(via thisismizhalle)

dreadful-record-of-sin:

shorm:

dreadful-record-of-sin:

livingwithdisability:

Do you see a Dalek or a shower?

I saw a shower, I think this firmly cements my status as “not a Doctor Who fan”.

wait but what is the second line supposed to be

idk a handrail or something(I’m sure it’s a dalek but that’s not how my brain parsed it when I saw it.)

I’m just worried that the person in a skirt/dress is going to fall over.

dreadful-record-of-sin:

shorm:

dreadful-record-of-sin:

livingwithdisability:

Do you see a Dalek or a shower?

I saw a shower, I think this firmly cements my status as “not a Doctor Who fan”.

wait but what is the second line supposed to be

idk a handrail or something

(I’m sure it’s a dalek but that’s not how my brain parsed it when I saw it.)

I’m just worried that the person in a skirt/dress is going to fall over.

(via moniquill)


Kelly: There’s one thing that Landis (the director) said that he was most impressed with Tim in this, and that he actually stands up and…steps backwards over his chair - and he’s tall enough to be able to do that.Steve: Yeah, he - like he’s being pulled on a rope over the chair. It’s one of the great subtle moments - I’m sorry, one of the few subtle moments on our show.(later)Steve: Oh, here’s Tim’s - here he is. There we go. Look at that.James: This looks like it was in reverse.Steve: Yeah, you actually need to have legs like Tim’s that go on forever. 


You know, this is only a subtle, impressive thing for all you short people. This is just how you deal with chairs when you’re tall.

Kelly: There’s one thing that Landis (the director) said that he was most impressed with Tim in this, and that he actually stands up and…steps backwards over his chair - and he’s tall enough to be able to do that.
Steve: Yeah, he - like he’s being pulled on a rope over the chair. It’s one of the great subtle moments - I’m sorry, one of the few subtle moments on our show.
(later)
Steve: Oh, here’s Tim’s - here he is. There we go. Look at that.
James: This looks like it was in reverse.
Steve: Yeah, you actually need to have legs like Tim’s that go on forever.

You know, this is only a subtle, impressive thing for all you short people. This is just how you deal with chairs when you’re tall.

(via entwashian)

adventuretime:

How did Adventure Time become better than most live-action TV shows?

A tip of the hat to Charlie Jane Anders at io9 for asking the question, "How did Adventure Time become better than most live-action TV shows?”

Seriously. I can’t stop thinking about Monday’s episode of Adventure Time, which was one of the most intense things I’ve seen in ages. The final scene, where Marceline and Ice King have this weird duet, made me lose my shit and keeps popping into my head. It’s rare that any television show gets its hooks into your brain like that, but especially a kid’s cartoon. It’s kind of nuts.

Read the whole piece here.

welovefineshirts:

Many thanks to Charlie Jane Anders at io9 for including some of our contest winners in this really excellent feature on how Adventure Time is so very, very awesome. (And it is!)

FIST TAP!

This is pretty much exactly what I was thinking watching the new episode. Then I went to go catch up on this season of Breaking Bad. I watch a lot of TV, and I love a lot of TV, but there are a few things that just make me so excited. Adventure Time, Breaking Bad, and The Booth at the End, and TBatE isn’t even broadcast in the U.S.

Incidentally, I would like to see more ficcing fans get into The Booth at the End because I’d love to see some crossovers.

(via adventuretime)

hightouchghost:

“lol stop saying things are racist, you’re overreacting” 

  • is surprised when PoC are killed in hate crimes

“lol stop saying things are ableist, you’re overreacting”

  • is surprised when medical institutions and society at large mistreat the mentally ill

“lol stop saying things are cissexist, you’re overreacting” or alternatively “stop saying things are transmisogynist, you’re overreacting”

  • is surprised when trans* women are killed for existing

“lol stop saying things are fat shaming, you’re overreacting”

  • is surprised when fat people are humiliated in public and treated like animals

“lol stop saying things are classist, you’re overreacting”

  • is surprised when people cannot afford to eat more than one meal a day for a period of weeks

“lol stop saying this show is problematic, you’re overreacting”

  • is surprised when studies show that lack of representation for non-privileged people negatively affects their lives

(via moniquill)

Why I Am No Longer Going to Watch Supernatural and Also Am Drunk

  • Tablesaw: http://www.hersheys.com/kisses.aspx
  • Geek Psyche: Snrk
  • Geek Psyche: Ohmygod are pumpkin spice kisses really a thing?!!!!
  • Tablesaw: APPARENTLY!
  • Tablesaw: ALSO I HAVE BEEN DRINKING BEER AND RYE
  • Tablesaw: AND GOTTEN VERY ANGRY AT SUPERNATURAL
  • Geek Psyche: I must have them!
  • Tablesaw: FOR LYING ABOUT THE MAYA
  • Geek Psyche: :-(
  • Geek Psyche: Is that why you're shouting?
  • Geek Psyche: Dare I ask what nonsense was being spread?
  • Tablesaw: Mostly I'm shouting because my dinner was basically a bunch of carrots and some alcohol.
  • Tablesaw: So many things. Big ones were:
  • Tablesaw: Maya ate sacrificial hearts
  • Tablesaw: Mayan is a dead language.
  • Tablesaw: Ancient Maya looked like white 20th century Americans.
  • Tablesaw: "Cacao" was the Maya god of maize.
  • Tablesaw: AND MUCH MUCH MORE
  • Tablesaw: ACT NOW!

Yesterday, instead of going shopping and making myself dinner and then going to bed, I watched all the TV, went to McDonald’s and fell asleep at 2 a.m. So that was terrible. But there was a lot of good TV to watch.

Elementary seems to be getting a lot of attention on Tumblr, but that might just be because I follow Mswyrr. But I was intrigued from the beginning. I read most of the original Holmes stories when I was a kid, I’ve watched countless TV shows and movies (the Jeremy Brett series, some Rathbones, Young Sherlock Holmes, Without a Clue, etc.), and I even owned and got people to play the Sherlock Holmes boardgame 221B Baker Street.

I’ve been doing this for a while, is what I’m saying.

As a TV show in general, it’s good, not great. It’s an odd-couple procedural crime show on American network television, which is pretty well-trodden ground (much of it inspired, to greater or lesser extent on the Holmes/Watson dynamic). As someone who’s watched a bunch of those, there isn’t too much in the pilot that I haven’t seen somewhere, and nothing yet stands out too much.

But I am really interested in the way that it comments on the tradition of Holmes stories. Going in with that context, I found that while nothing stood out, there were lots of little things that hung back, waiting to be noticed. They’re the things I liked.

I often complained about the ways that these kinds of procedurals lionize their heros as “Byronic detectives.” Yes, they’re moody, and abusive, and do terrible things, but they are GREAT MEN who must be respected and allowed to do what they do however they choose to do it. In these shows, we’re led to believe that all this terrible behavior are just minor flaws in service of a great genius. There are lots of odd-couple procedurals where the watson or someone else calls the holmes out on their behavior, but the show still supports the singular importance of its Byronic hero. (I think that the BBC Sherlock is the epitome of this, because its impeccable production drives this perspective home with brutal efficacy.)

In Elementary, it’s not just Watson that thinks that Holmes is a self-destructive, self-involved, manipulative addict, the show thinks so too. The pilot very specifically shows us that Holmes lies (not just stretches the truth or overstates his case) and that he acts without thinking, often catastrophically.

There’s a moment in when Holmes is describing his previous work with Scotland Yard when he explains that he never accepted payment so that he wouldn’t have to answer to anyone. And there’s a little moment there, where Holmes seems to realize that didn’t get the reaction he expected, that Watson wasn’t impressed that he chose his ideals over money, and that perhaps that’s because, as an employee of his father, she knows that it wasn’t a sacrifice at all, but instead a childish gesture, much like the instinct to add that particular flourish to his story, years later.

Having Watson explicitly placed as a sober companion is important, because it gives an in-character context for this reframing. This is not a Watson that’s going to be constantly shocked and unprepared for Holmes’s behavior because that behavior is explicitly what she is there to deal with. Every abusive, trivializing, self-destructive thing that Holmes does in the Elementary pilot is in line with him being a self-destructive addict just out of rehab, particularly someone who is also very intelligent and who needs to reestablish control over his surroundings. Watson may occasionally be surprised by Holmes’s moves, but she always knows something is coming. Because one of the things the sober companion does is to make sure that addiction is not romanticized.

And that seems the approach of the show, to make sure that Holmes isn’t the romantic, Byronic detective, and is instead a real and chaotic individual. And in the way it approaches Holmes’s addiction, it reminds me very strongly of The Seven Per-Cent Solution, which explains the Great Hiatus (Holmes’s supposed death and return) as being the result of Holmes seeking the help of Sigmund Freud to recover from a mental breakdown due to his addiction. I wouldn’t be at all surprised to discover that this show draws heavily from that story.

It’s not surprising that an unromantic look at Sherlock Holmes isn’t going to be have a stunning beginning, but I’m think I’m going to enjoy watching it build.

more on parallels in 2x01

mswyrr:

Root is there to bring out aspects of Finch’s character and arc. I got that right off. But then I realized that Bear the adorable dog is there to bring out aspects of Reese’s character and arc. LOL

He’s a good soldier, loyal and trained in combat. He gets ill-used by destructive fools, but he’s not the “Butcher” they want him to be. He’s just a good soldier looking for someone good to follow.

And they both like dropping by Carter’s place unannounced.

That’s so… sad yet completely adorable LOL

Personally, I think that Bear represents the Machine more than Reese. Bear was trained carefully by a loving master and is anxious around people whom it does not respect. Reese doesn’t understand the training, but knows how to work with a well-trained animal. I expect Reese to be put out by having to keep a dog as much as he enjoys its company, in the same way that he’s getting annoyed by the Machine.

DJ (with three hair clips arranged haphazardly in his hair): Dad, how do I look?
Dan: Beautiful.
DJ: Guys aren’t supposed to look beautiful!
Dan: DAMN beautiful!
DJ: That’s better!

(via intoaspiralfrenzy)