Fake Geek Boys

Why aren’t more women worried about the Fake Geek Boys like The Spider Sam who just dress up in skimpy clothes for attention?

thespidersam:

 

Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

That’s what it felt like, yes.

That’s what it felt like, yes.


The Middleman - The Doomsday Armageddon Apocalypse


Original Tags: #if you watch the Comic Con read-through of this episode on YouTube #you can hear me laughing uproariously at this part

The Middleman - The Doomsday Armageddon Apocalypse

Original Tags: #if you watch the Comic Con read-through of this episode on YouTube #you can hear me laughing uproariously at this part

(via entwashian)

princelesscomic:

mizmlee:

DUDES. ^THIS HAPPENS.

I just found out about Princeless today.

Black female protagonist. Comics. Kicking Ass.

I’m getting myself a copy today :D

Glad you approve!

(via moniquill)

cracked:

The original Avengers promo image and Kevin Bolk’s wonderful, pointed parody.

(via demuze)

websnark:

I do not know how T Campbell or Jason Waltrop’s minds work.
Seriously. I have no freaking clue.
Be careful clicking the above image to go to the original — it is the entire run of the current Fans storyline… which was written and drawn to work as a cruciverbalist comic. Which is 2700 pixels by 2800 pixels (including the title bar at the bottom), and several megabytes in size. Best not to do it on a 3G connection.
What does that mean?
It means it works as a pictoral crossword grid. If you follow the ‘down’ bits where they would logically appear in such a thing, they work as thematic storylines even as across works as the literal storyline.
I do not know how their minds work. They scare me sometimes. But they also impress me.
Here are the rules for creating one of these as listed in his final storyline post:

Here are the rules for doing a cruciverbacomic, in case you’d like to try this exercise yourself.
1. Start with a filled-in crossword grid. You can make your own like I did, or take one from another source, as long as you give credit. The grid should follow the standard New York Times rules: no uncrossed squares, no two-letter words, and no horribly obscure words or words you just made up. Rotational symmetry’s also desirable but not an absolute requirement. (Note: you can rework this grid later if you need to, but it should continue to obey these rules.)
2. Your comics story should consist of square panels, each of them corresponding to one square within the grid.
3. Panels that correspond to black squares should be silent, meaning no dialogue balloons, thought balloons, sound effects or “commentary effects” like “EPIC FAIL.” (I’ve borrowed “commentary effects” from Internet imagery like I Can Has Cheezburger?, though they also have some antecedent in the Japanese tradition of making “sound effects” for things that aren’t actually sounds, and I’m far from the only American comics person to use them.)
Depicting letters in a silent panel is acceptable if the letters would be visible in a film, like a stop sign or a signature on a check. The black-square panels should also be darkened in some way that makes their status clear when the comics grid is completed. (I opted for heavy borders.)
4. In the other panels, the first letter of a dialogue balloon, thought balloon, sound effect or commentary effect should correspond to the letter inside the corresponding square.
5. Each word in the crossword, whether entered across or down, should be a part of the dialogue balloons, thought balloons, sound effects or commentary effects in a comics panel that corresponds to one of the word’s squares.
6. The comic should be able to “pass” as a regular comics story with a narrative thread, not just an assortment of unconnected occurrences.
There are no other restrictions on size, genre or content. Have fun!

websnark:

I do not know how T Campbell or Jason Waltrop’s minds work.

Seriously. I have no freaking clue.

Be careful clicking the above image to go to the original — it is the entire run of the current Fans storyline… which was written and drawn to work as a cruciverbalist comic. Which is 2700 pixels by 2800 pixels (including the title bar at the bottom), and several megabytes in size. Best not to do it on a 3G connection.

What does that mean?

It means it works as a pictoral crossword grid. If you follow the ‘down’ bits where they would logically appear in such a thing, they work as thematic storylines even as across works as the literal storyline.

I do not know how their minds work. They scare me sometimes. But they also impress me.

Here are the rules for creating one of these as listed in his final storyline post:

Here are the rules for doing a cruciverbacomic, in case you’d like to try this exercise yourself.

1. Start with a filled-in crossword grid. You can make your own like I did, or take one from another source, as long as you give credit. The grid should follow the standard New York Times rules: no uncrossed squares, no two-letter words, and no horribly obscure words or words you just made up. Rotational symmetry’s also desirable but not an absolute requirement. (Note: you can rework this grid later if you need to, but it should continue to obey these rules.)

2. Your comics story should consist of square panels, each of them corresponding to one square within the grid.

3. Panels that correspond to black squares should be silent, meaning no dialogue balloons, thought balloons, sound effects or “commentary effects” like “EPIC FAIL.” (I’ve borrowed “commentary effects” from Internet imagery like I Can Has Cheezburger?, though they also have some antecedent in the Japanese tradition of making “sound effects” for things that aren’t actually sounds, and I’m far from the only American comics person to use them.)

Depicting letters in a silent panel is acceptable if the letters would be visible in a film, like a stop sign or a signature on a check. The black-square panels should also be darkened in some way that makes their status clear when the comics grid is completed. (I opted for heavy borders.)

4. In the other panels, the first letter of a dialogue balloon, thought balloon, sound effect or commentary effect should correspond to the letter inside the corresponding square.

5. Each word in the crossword, whether entered across or down, should be a part of the dialogue balloons, thought balloons, sound effects or commentary effects in a comics panel that corresponds to one of the word’s squares.

6. The comic should be able to “pass” as a regular comics story with a narrative thread, not just an assortment of unconnected occurrences.

There are no other restrictions on size, genre or content. Have fun!

koncubine:

ealperin:

gabzilla-z:

electrophilic:

bananachoo:

dccomicfreak:


YEAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH 



 #OOOOOOUUUUWAA-AAA #OU-OU #OU-OU

F L A W L E S S

Yep! ^_^ Deserves an instant reblog! ^_^
B)

koncubine:

ealperin:

gabzilla-z:

electrophilic:

bananachoo:

dccomicfreak:

YEAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

 #OOOOOOUUUUWAA-AAA #OU-OU #OU-OU

F L A W L E S S

Yep! ^_^ Deserves an instant reblog! ^_^

B)

(via janejana)

probablyadragon:

Because blocks remain perfectly horizontal and level to the ground regardless of gravity at all times. SCIENCE!

probablyadragon:

Because blocks remain perfectly horizontal and level to the ground regardless of gravity at all times. SCIENCE!


Day 08 - The game that is currently playing.

I assume that’s a game I’m currently playing. I keep a few in rotation, but in the big console is Fatal Frame for the Xbox. It’s wonderfully creepy and atmospheric, and it’s got a sense of real place and consistency about it that keeps me wanting to see more.
Also, it can be a bit creepy.

Day 08 - The game that is currently playing.

I assume that’s a game I’m currently playing. I keep a few in rotation, but in the big console is Fatal Frame for the Xbox. It’s wonderfully creepy and atmospheric, and it’s got a sense of real place and consistency about it that keeps me wanting to see more.

Also, it can be a bit creepy.