dirkxcaliborn:

solluxcraptor:

ms-jane-crocker:

slytherinpirate:

joanegbert:

hershelclayton:

the-fandom-queen-of-skaia:

thekhooll:

Accident
The Headington Shark is an unusual installation by sculptor John Buckley that features a shark crashing head-first through the roof of a home. 

Don’t say it

It hurts to not say it

i wanna say it

please can i say it

Someone needs to say it

You say it

Sharknado

Oh, man. I was going to say they needed a bigger house.

dirkxcaliborn:

solluxcraptor:

ms-jane-crocker:

slytherinpirate:

joanegbert:

hershelclayton:

the-fandom-queen-of-skaia:

thekhooll:

Accident

The Headington Shark is an unusual installation by sculptor John Buckley that features a shark crashing head-first through the roof of a home. 

Don’t say it

It hurts to not say it

i wanna say it

please can i say it

Someone needs to say it

You say it

Sharknado

Oh, man. I was going to say they needed a bigger house.

(via ktempest)

killingforsport-eatingthebodies:

evangelinedawson:

jawnn-locked:

johnlock-consulting-husbands:

flaming-tigers:

rulelikeaunicorn:

yunholic:

supercthulhu:

b1gb00tyb1tch3s:

c-c-chuck:

kiwibutt:

xybutt:

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that



WHAT THE FUCK IS THAT

Pony, by Tim Lewis

killingforsport-eatingthebodies:

evangelinedawson:

jawnn-locked:

johnlock-consulting-husbands:

flaming-tigers:

rulelikeaunicorn:

yunholic:

supercthulhu:

b1gb00tyb1tch3s:

c-c-chuck:

kiwibutt:

xybutt:

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

what the fuck is that

WHAT THE FUCK IS THAT

Pony, by Tim Lewis

(via halleluyang)

Jonaya K:

I would be stupid to say that I am not afraid.

But I am.

Even though my intent is to go into a public space with public art, I am afraid. My intentions are peaceful and my desire is only to make people question Art and their own place in a narrative being spun out of control.

I am a teacher. Everyday I teach children to use their words instead of their fists. I teach children that in order to be listened to, one must listen. Tonight, I sincerely hope that instead of coming out in force the LAPD listen.

So here is the question. If my intentions are peaceful, and my actions just, then why am I afraid?

Last month at Art Walk, I was apart of peaceful protesters. I went down there because I was taught to stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. I was also taught by my College, that Art is ultimately subjective. One person’s chalk scribble is another person’s piece about personal expression and political expression.

Art does not need to be confined to a canvas, but often it is. Your body is art. Your words are art. Your entire life philosophically speaking, can be considered art. Whether you or your God is the creator is purely up to personal belief.

But enough esoteric talk.

I am afraid.

 Last time I was repeatedly shoved and hit with a baton because I would not clear the sidewalk. However it was never my intention to block the sidewalk. I was taking pictures of a woman being arrested for chalking a bunny/dog. The Officer in question, Officer I, if you will, pulled out his nightstick with his fellow officers and began to slam it into my forearms while pushing me into the street. The other officers began to push the few people that were there from the site of the arrest as well. I repeatedly kept my cool, stating that I was a preschool teacher and I would gladly move but there were many people behind me and I had no place to go. I repeatedly asked him to not hit me. He didn’t listen. Instead he repeatedly slammed the nightstick into my arms, causing bruises. In the end I got moved maybe a foot and the sidewalk cleared on it’s own as people just scooted.

That is why I am afraid.

But enough about that. Let’s talk about why I’m doing this even though I *am* afraid.

Public Discourse and Political art have always been received with disgust. Los Angeles does have a long history of challenging what art is by using public spaces and public art. I hope this piece continues in this vein. When I personally think of chalking, I don’t think of graffiti, which in itself can be described as it’s own art form that is used to mark territory in worse forms and celebrate culture in its best. No, I don’t consider chalking and graffit the same. I thinkof  the serious notion that by picking up a piece of chalk in the city of Los Angeles, you are breaking the law.

But what happens when you remove the chalk from the sidewalk and put it onto canvas? Is it now legitimized by it being on canvas? Does it become art because it is in a more accepted media? It is no longer city property. If one were to chalk on canvas it couldn’t possibly cause arrest, and if it did why would it? Why is a sidewalk vandalism, and a canvas art?

I invite you to come talk with me about Art and Public Art in general tonight in Pershing Square. I also invite you to be apart of a collaborative art piece that begs to ask these questions and many others: “At what point does freedom of expression become vandalism? At what point does a marginalized people’s words become appropriate to be consumed by the Art Media? Is it possible to enjoy a city where children must buy canvas to draw rainbows and hopscotch boards?”

Jonaya K:

I would be stupid to say that I am not afraid.

But I am.

Even though my intent is to go into a public space with public art, I am afraid. My intentions are peaceful and my desire is only to make people question Art and their own place in a narrative being spun out of control.

I am a teacher. Everyday I teach children to use their words instead of their fists. I teach children that in order to be listened to, one must listen. Tonight, I sincerely hope that instead of coming out in force the LAPD listen.

So here is the question. If my intentions are peaceful, and my actions just, then why am I afraid?

Last month at Art Walk, I was apart of peaceful protesters. I went down there because I was taught to stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. I was also taught by my College, that Art is ultimately subjective. One person’s chalk scribble is another person’s piece about personal expression and political expression.

Art does not need to be confined to a canvas, but often it is. Your body is art. Your words are art. Your entire life philosophically speaking, can be considered art. Whether you or your God is the creator is purely up to personal belief.

But enough esoteric talk.

I am afraid.

Last time I was repeatedly shoved and hit with a baton because I would not clear the sidewalk. However it was never my intention to block the sidewalk. I was taking pictures of a woman being arrested for chalking a bunny/dog. The Officer in question, Officer I, if you will, pulled out his nightstick with his fellow officers and began to slam it into my forearms while pushing me into the street. The other officers began to push the few people that were there from the site of the arrest as well. I repeatedly kept my cool, stating that I was a preschool teacher and I would gladly move but there were many people behind me and I had no place to go. I repeatedly asked him to not hit me. He didn’t listen. Instead he repeatedly slammed the nightstick into my arms, causing bruises. In the end I got moved maybe a foot and the sidewalk cleared on it’s own as people just scooted.

That is why I am afraid.

But enough about that. Let’s talk about why I’m doing this even though I *am* afraid.

Public Discourse and Political art have always been received with disgust. Los Angeles does have a long history of challenging what art is by using public spaces and public art. I hope this piece continues in this vein. When I personally think of chalking, I don’t think of graffiti, which in itself can be described as it’s own art form that is used to mark territory in worse forms and celebrate culture in its best. No, I don’t consider chalking and graffit the same. I thinkof the serious notion that by picking up a piece of chalk in the city of Los Angeles, you are breaking the law.

But what happens when you remove the chalk from the sidewalk and put it onto canvas? Is it now legitimized by it being on canvas? Does it become art because it is in a more accepted media? It is no longer city property. If one were to chalk on canvas it couldn’t possibly cause arrest, and if it did why would it? Why is a sidewalk vandalism, and a canvas art?

I invite you to come talk with me about Art and Public Art in general tonight in Pershing Square. I also invite you to be apart of a collaborative art piece that begs to ask these questions and many others: “At what point does freedom of expression become vandalism? At what point does a marginalized people’s words become appropriate to be consumed by the Art Media? Is it possible to enjoy a city where children must buy canvas to draw rainbows and hopscotch boards?”

Lalo Alcaraz

Lalo Alcaraz

Few artists in the world challenge the penny-for-penny profits of global capitalism as bluntly as Mexico City native Cuevas. She puts revolutionary slogans inside mass-produced fortune cookies and hands out bottles of water taped with the word “Egalite” instead of “Evian,” because shouldn’t water always be free?

Her free pay phone is a new work produced for an exhibit at the Museo de la Ciudad de Mexico, or Museum of Mexico City. The show, on view until Aug. 5, covers a career defined by Cuevas’ knack at turning art into giveaways for ordinary people hustling to make ends meet in a tough city. They are particularly subversive gestures for Mexico, the artist says, a society where the very wealthy and connected usually get all the shortcuts and giveaways they might wish.

Cuevas’ Mejor Vida Corp. is perhaps her most well-known conceptual project. This Better Life “corporation” distributed subway tickets inside underground stations, handed out low-price barcodes to sneak onto items in stores, and produced fake student ID cards (for transit and entertainment discounts) by request from strangers.
—Daniel Hernandez, “Mexico artist Minerva Cuevas is giving away phone calls,” LA Times
Few artists in the world challenge the penny-for-penny profits of global capitalism as bluntly as Mexico City native Cuevas. She puts revolutionary slogans inside mass-produced fortune cookies and hands out bottles of water taped with the word “Egalite” instead of “Evian,” because shouldn’t water always be free? Her free pay phone is a new work produced for an exhibit at the Museo de la Ciudad de Mexico, or Museum of Mexico City. The show, on view until Aug. 5, covers a career defined by Cuevas’ knack at turning art into giveaways for ordinary people hustling to make ends meet in a tough city. They are particularly subversive gestures for Mexico, the artist says, a society where the very wealthy and connected usually get all the shortcuts and giveaways they might wish. Cuevas’ Mejor Vida Corp. is perhaps her most well-known conceptual project. This Better Life “corporation” distributed subway tickets inside underground stations, handed out low-price barcodes to sneak onto items in stores, and produced fake student ID cards (for transit and entertainment discounts) by request from strangers.

Daniel Hernandez, “Mexico artist Minerva Cuevas is giving away phone calls,” LA Times

God, in a weird way, I’m going after footnote glory.

I need to repost this blog more often.
God, in a weird way, I’m going after footnote glory.
I need to repost this blog more often.
detribalizedaztec:

From my sketch book, with love.
The Lady of Copán.Sketch10 x 7”04/11/12I recently read an article about new discoveries made by Shankari Patel, an anthropology graduate student at the University of California-Riverside, which states that Mayan women were in fact powerful leaders within the society. No glass ceilings existed for the Women of pre-columbian Mexico, how powerful is that? In Mesoamerica there were both female doctors and female authority figures. 

Research Re-examines Role of Maya Women: UCR graduate student’s discoveries in the British Museum and on the Yucatan Peninsula prompt reinterpretation of women’s roles in pre-colonial Mexico.

detribalizedaztec:

From my sketch book, with love.

The Lady of Copán.
Sketch
10 x 7”
04/11/12

I recently read an article about new discoveries made by Shankari Patel, an anthropology graduate student at the University of California-Riverside, which states that Mayan women were in fact powerful leaders within the society. No glass ceilings existed for the Women of pre-columbian Mexico, how powerful is that? In Mesoamerica there were both female doctors and female authority figures. 

Research Re-examines Role of Maya Women: UCR graduate student’s discoveries in the British Museum and on the Yucatan Peninsula prompt reinterpretation of women’s roles in pre-colonial Mexico.

Last night, I went to see the reunion show for That Dog. It’s been 20 years since they released their first EP, which is about the same time (probably later in the year), that I listend to them do a live set on KCRW on Brave New World.

The show was billed as having songs that were rarely or never played live. I’m glad it was because That Dog has always been better in the deep cuts than the singles. Listening to them perform “Paid Programming” took me back to that time, lying on the floor of my bedroom listening to the radio, falling in love.

Last night, I went to see the reunion show for That Dog. It’s been 20 years since they released their first EP, which is about the same time (probably later in the year), that I listend to them do a live set on KCRW on Brave New World.

The show was billed as having songs that were rarely or never played live. I’m glad it was because That Dog has always been better in the deep cuts than the singles. Listening to them perform “Paid Programming” took me back to that time, lying on the floor of my bedroom listening to the radio, falling in love.

chadilaksono:

Washington Monument, National Mall, Washington D.C.
Took a road trip down to D.C. last weekend to see the cherry blossoms. We didn’t see much cherry blossoms, but there were tons of kites! It’s been so long since I’ve gone on a road trip. I even got to drive!

This makes me wistful for my tiem in D.C.

chadilaksono:

Washington Monument, National Mall, Washington D.C.

Took a road trip down to D.C. last weekend to see the cherry blossoms. We didn’t see much cherry blossoms, but there were tons of kites! It’s been so long since I’ve gone on a road trip. I even got to drive!

This makes me wistful for my tiem in D.C.

emleighwolf:

I hate promoting myself so I’m just gonna get this over with.
This is my show in this year’s FRIGID Festival in New York.
Thursday, February 23 - 9:00pmSunday, February 26 - 7:00pmMonday, February 27 - 6:00pmFriday, March 2 - 7:30pmSaturday, March 3 - 2:30pmTickets are $13 at the door or $10 online athttp://www.smarttix.com/show.aspx?showcode=ter0C3&ss=1Umberto MacDougal is back in this one hour production in New York’s FRIGID Festival to allow you to look through the window of his tragic manpain. Accompanied by a melancholy guitarist playing a sorrowful tune, Umberto recounts his woeful memories and shares with you his most intimate poetry in hopes that you will understand the pain that men feel.Directed by Bricken SparacinoStarring Emleigh Wolfand Mike Ogletree
Under St. Marks Theater
94 St. Marks Place (between Ave A and 1st Ave)
New York, NY 10009
http://youtu.be/Nagfuoie5y8
Reblog please if you know someone in NYC who might be interested.  That is all, back to my regularly scheduled fangirling.

I have no idea what this is, but this is a great poster and title. I love the #manpain tag on tumblr. It isn’t used often, but when it is, it’s fantastic.

emleighwolf:

I hate promoting myself so I’m just gonna get this over with.

This is my show in this year’s FRIGID Festival in New York.

Thursday, February 23 - 9:00pm
Sunday, February 26 - 7:00pm
Monday, February 27 - 6:00pm
Friday, March 2 - 7:30pm
Saturday, March 3 - 2:30pm

Tickets are $13 at the door or $10 online at
http://www.smarttix.com/
show.aspx?showcode=ter0C3&ss=1

Umberto MacDougal is back in this one hour production in New York’s FRIGID Festival to allow you to look through the window of his tragic manpain. Accompanied by a melancholy guitarist playing a sorrowful tune, Umberto recounts his woeful memories and shares with you his most intimate poetry in hopes that you will understand the pain that men feel.

Directed by Bricken Sparacino
Starring Emleigh Wolf
and Mike Ogletree

Under St. Marks Theater

94 St. Marks Place (between Ave A and 1st Ave)

New York, NY 10009

http://youtu.be/Nagfuoie5y8

Reblog please if you know someone in NYC who might be interested.  That is all, back to my regularly scheduled fangirling.

I have no idea what this is, but this is a great poster and title. I love the #manpain tag on tumblr. It isn’t used often, but when it is, it’s fantastic.

I haven’t seen this illusion in a while, actually.

I haven’t seen this illusion in a while, actually.

kathryndraws:

Hometown

I love that the Honeybaked Ham store is on there. AS IT SHOULD BE.

kathryndraws:

Hometown

I love that the Honeybaked Ham store is on there. AS IT SHOULD BE.