l0stw0rlds:

shots from tripgate

Dear character on Bachelor in Paradise:

No.

Dear character on Bachelor in Paradise:

No.

revolvermonkcelot:

friedcheesemogu:

I feel like I should reblog this every day.

me too


Me, every day, for all of you.

revolvermonkcelot:

friedcheesemogu:

I feel like I should reblog this every day.

me too

Me, every day, for all of you.

(via zarhooie)

journolist:

National Moment of Silence 2014

On August 14, 2014, citizens across America will gather in solidarity to hold vigils and observe a moment of silence to honor victims of Police Brutality
Police Brutality in the United States continues to be a pervasive problem that affects communities across the country. In recent years, we have had news of too many people losing their lives as a result of police brutality. We have also heard too many stories of people being sexually and otherwise physically assaulted by police. We are gathering together to observe a National Moment of Silence to pay respect to the lives lost and/or forever changed by the brutality of the police state.Too many citizens have suffered. Their families and friends need our positive energy and support in this moment of anger, frustration, fear, and helplessness.

How the #NMOS14 Began: 

How social media helped facilitate a national moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality, show solidarity with their families, and allow communities to come together in a moment of mourning and support.

Vigils: 

Annapolis, Maryland 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Baltimore, Maryland 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
Bloomington, Indiana 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Bremerton, Washington 
Brooklyn, New York 
Carson City, Nevada 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
Chicago, Illinois 
Columbia, South Carolina 
Columbus, Ohio 
Dallas, Texas 
Denver, Colorado 
Detroit, Michigan 
Durham, North Carolina 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Houston, Texas
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Kansas City, Missouri
Knoxville, Tennessee  
Lansing, Michigan 
Long Island, New York 
Los Angeles, California 
Lower Manhattan, New York 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Nashville, Tennessee 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
Orlando, Florida
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Portland, Maine 
Providence, Rhode Island 
Rochester, New York 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
San Antonio, Texas 
San Francisco, California 
Seattle, Washington 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Tampa, Florida 
Valdosta, Georgia
Vancouver, Canada 
Washington, D.C.
West Palm Beach, Florida 
Woodbridge, Virginia 
Wyckoff, New Jersey 

 More cities are being added, check here for updates and info on starting a vigil in your city. 

journolist:

National Moment of Silence 2014

On August 14, 2014, citizens across America will gather in solidarity to hold vigils and observe a moment of silence to honor victims of Police Brutality

Police Brutality in the United States continues to be a pervasive problem that affects communities across the country. In recent years, we have had news of too many people losing their lives as a result of police brutality. We have also heard too many stories of people being sexually and otherwise physically assaulted by police. 

We are gathering together to observe a National Moment of Silence to pay respect to the lives lost and/or forever changed by the brutality of the police state.

Too many citizens have suffered. Their families and friends need our positive energy and support in this moment of anger, frustration, fear, and helplessness.

How the #NMOS14 Began

How social media helped facilitate a national moment of silence to honor victims of police brutality, show solidarity with their families, and allow communities to come together in a moment of mourning and support.

Vigils:

Annapolis, Maryland

Atlanta, Georgia

Baltimore, Maryland

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Bloomington, Indiana

Boston, Massachusetts

Bremerton, Washington

Brooklyn, New York

Carson City, Nevada

Charlotte, North Carolina

Chicago, Illinois

Columbia, South Carolina

Columbus, Ohio

Dallas, Texas

Denver, Colorado

Detroit, Michigan

Durham, North Carolina

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Houston, Texas

Indianapolis, Indiana

Kansas City, Missouri

Knoxville, Tennessee  

Lansing, Michigan

Long Island, New York

Los Angeles, California

Lower Manhattan, New York

Memphis, Tennessee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Nashville, Tennessee

New Brunswick, New Jersey

New Orleans, Louisiana

Orlando, Florida

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Portland, Maine

Providence, Rhode Island

Rochester, New York

Salt Lake City, Utah

San Antonio, Texas

San Francisco, California

Seattle, Washington

St. Louis, Missouri

Tampa, Florida

Valdosta, Georgia

Vancouver, Canada

Washington, D.C.

West Palm Beach, Florida

Woodbridge, Virginia

Wyckoff, New Jersey

 More cities are being added, check here for updates and info on starting a vigil in your city. 

(via seekingwillow)

audreyii-fic:

"Ghostbusters" starring Mindy Kaling, America Ferrera, Aubrey Plaza, and Rebel Wilson

(via nonelvis)

Uploaded from my phone, August 08, 2014 at 01:52PM

Uploaded from my phone, August 08, 2014 at 01:52PM

Uploaded from my phone, August 08, 2014 at 12:56PM

Uploaded from my phone, August 08, 2014 at 12:56PM

superopinionated:

lolzforshits:

*gets stuck on a mission in a game* *doesn’t play for another 4234 years*

This is how you’re supposed to play videogames, right? Why else would they design missions like that?

animatedscreenshots:

image
Super Mario Land 2: 6 Golden Coins

image
Wario Land: Super Mario Land 3

image
Donkey Kong

image
Kirby’s Dream Land 2

(via animatedscreenshots)

Rip Out the Binding, Tear the Glue

There’s a minor furor in the Google Plus RPG circle on which I wander around the periphery over a series of posts about a ceremonial burning of Dungeons & Dragons, Fourth Edition, in preparation for the new fifth edition. (You may not be familiar with D&D “edition wars,” but I’m sure you can extraploate to a similar situation where fans of a particular thing that goes through multiple iterations argue loudly and fervently about which iteration is good or bad or perfect or heretical, etc.)

And then this happened on twitter:

It’s probably not a coincidence that Hoarders was on in the background earlier and now I’m reexamining my relationship toward books. I’m not a hoarder, but the fear on the faces of people trying to pick which things to get rid of reminded me of the same mindlock I felt when I attempted culling my books last time I moved. It was too hard, and there wasn’t enough time for me to work my way through it, and I panicked, and all the books went into boxes.

There were consequences to not doing so. Those books took up space and they carried an extra weight; as appropriate for books, they did so literally. The physical books that I do not need took a toll on my back, and on the bodies of my friends who helped to move them. (And I haven’t yet taken the time to do a proper culling.)

And beyond that, I have books that I do not believe are worth the trouble for anyone. I have a mass-market book with no original research that is still substantially large and heavy, because it was designed as a coffee-table book, despite a lifeless presentation. It’s not just that I don’t need this book; I don’t think anyone needs this book. And I suspect that anyone who thinks they want this book is wrong, because for a very long time, I was that person who deeply believed that they should just hold onto it for a little longer. I think that to inflict this mess of ink and wood pulp that tangentially contains some incomplete summaries of Irish genealogical information would be irresponsible. I don’t want to shift the responsibility of dispatching it onto a nonprofit organization that could instead be shelving a book of even some slim use.

But I just can’t toss it into the trash. Because it’s still a book.

I still have my first book. My copy of Where the Wild Things Are is as old, and as soiled, and as marked as you would expect. And while I feel that there’s a novelty in having that artifact, I often question why I hold onto it. The vast majority of my personal artifacts have already been worn down or given away. I don’t know how that copy would be of interest to anyone, even my own children. Now it mostly represents how hard I cling to books as other things fall away.

And there are books, too, that I think others would find value in, but that I do not feel comfortable giving. I have books that once brought me joy, but that, now, having grown older or learned terrible things about the creators, I hate to look at. I know that others would want them and read them, but I still feel responsible for my custody of them. I want to undo what I did in buying and keeping them.

Book burning, as a single phrase, is more than the burning of books. It’s burning books at someone. But burning something, anything, can be powerfully personal. I have a hard time letting go of books, and I proposed this as a group camping activity because my sense is that, among the geeky people at that campfire, I would not be alone. Sometimes there are books we need to let go, and we have nowhere else to put them.

Throw them on the fire.

comment count unavailable comments

Crossposted from Tablesaw! http://ift.tt/1nWvOCz

Uploaded from my phone, July 20, 2014 at 04:44PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 20, 2014 at 04:44PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 19, 2014 at 03:57PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 19, 2014 at 03:57PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 19, 2014 at 03:57PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 19, 2014 at 03:57PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 19, 2014 at 03:34PM

Uploaded from my phone, July 19, 2014 at 03:34PM